Call me Ishmael, still
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Call me Ishmael, still poems by Harry Lewis LeFever

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Published by Walden Birch Press in [Springfield, PA?] .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Harry Lewis LeFever
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3612.E349675 C35 2011
The Physical Object
Pagination52 pages :
Number of Pages52
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25197606M
ISBN 109781601262936
LC Control Number2011934400

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  Call me Ishmael. Words that still resonate over years after Melville wrote them. Even those who have never picked up the book know this opening. Call me Ishmael. Three words that are both traditional and iconoclastic: seeming to identify of the narrator, yet equivocating. Daniel Quinn's philosophical novel Ishmael: An Adventure of the Mind and Spirit opens with the narrator reading the newspaper and finding himself both disgruntled and intrigued by a personal advertisement. The ad indicates that a teacher is looking for a student interested in saving the world. For most of the narrator's early life, he had searched for such a teacher, and he's angry that only. The published book tells the tale of Captain Ahab’s journey in pursuit of a whale that he calls Moby Dick. The Guardian, a British national daily newspaper, listed it as one of the greatest American novels of all time. Image credit: Call Me Ishmael. Call Me Ishmael is still in its inception stage, so there hasn’t been much talk about it. Call me Ishmael. Some years ago- never mind how long precisely- having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen and regulating the circulation.

  Hounded by the school bully and struck dumb in the presence of girls, the year doesn't get off to a good start for Ishmael when he is asked to take misfit James Scobie under his wing. "Call me Ishmael" sets the tone for the whole book. It is mysterious. It is sonorous, suggesting the crashing of waves and the rhythm of the sea. It draws the reader into the irrational, relentless. obsessive hunt for the White Whale. "Call me Ishmael," perhaps the most famous opening line in literary history, is in fact not the first line of Moby-Dick. Yes, Chapter 1 ("Loomings") of the novel begins with Ishmael introducing himself. Best First Lines from Novels 1. Call me Ishmael. —Herman Melville, Moby-Dick () 2. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. —Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice () 3. A screaming comes across the sky. —Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow () Size: 36KB.